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Archive for the ‘Earnings Announcement Options Strategy’ Category

How to Play the Upcoming Facebook Earnings Announcement

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Over the last 3 weeks, I have suggested a way to leg into calendar spreads at a credit in advance of the earnings announcement for Starbucks (SBUX), Facebook (FB), and Abbvie (ABBV). All three calendars ended up being completed, and all three have already delivered a small profit. Once earnings are announced and the short side of the calendar spread expires, all three spreads are guaranteed to produce a much larger profit as well (depending on how close the stock price is to the strike price).

Today I would like to discuss another Facebook play. While this one does not guarantee profits, I believe it is even more exciting in many ways. It is possible that you could double your money in less than two weeks. I also believe it is extremely unlikely to lose money.

Terry

How to Play the Upcoming Facebook Earnings Announcement

All sorts of articles have been written over the past few weeks about the prospects for FB, some positive and some negative. We will all learn who was right and who was wrong late next week when FB announces earnings on April 27, and the details of the company’s large assortment of new and wondrous initiatives will be disclosed.

The high degree of uncertainty over the announcement has caused implied volatility (IV) of the options to soar, particularly in the series that expires two days after the announcement. Those Apr5-16 options carry an IV of 52. This compares to only 35 for longer-term option series and 32 for the Apr4-16 series which expires this week.

Buying calendar spreads at this time represents one of the best opportunities I have ever seen to buy cheap options and sell expensive options against them. The FB calendar spreads are exceptionally cheap right now, at least to my way of thinking.

I have written an article which was published by TheStreet.com today which describes the actual calendar spreads I have bought yesterday and today (and I have bought a lot of them). The article fully explains my thinking as to which spreads I purchased. Read the full article here.

Earnings Season Has Arrived – How to Capitalize on it With Options

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

For each of the last two Mondays I have told you about an earnings-related trade I made. Today I would like to review my thinking on those trades, update how they are going, and offer you a new idea of a third trade I made his morning.

Terry

Earnings Season Has Arrived – How to Capitalize on it With Options

In the last few weeks leading up to a quarterly earnings announcement, two things usually happen. First of all, the stock often moves higher as the announcement day approaches as some investors start hoping that the company might beat expectations. The second thing is even more likely (and essentially always happens). Implied Volatility (IV) of the option prices moves much high. This means that the prices for options temporarily rise in value across the board. The greatest upward move in IV takes place in the options series which expires just after the announcement date.

The reason that IV becomes greater at this time is that once earnings are announced, the stock is likely to move either up or down by a much larger amount than it does most trading days. When volatility is expected to be high, option prices rise in anticipation of that higher level of anticipated price changes.

One of my favorite option plays is based on these two tendencies to occur as the announcement day approaches. I like to leg into a calendar spread at a strike price which is slightly higher than the stock price. I do this by buying a call option at that strike in the option series that expires two weeks after the series which expires just after the announcement is made. Once I have made my purchase, I place a good-til-cancelled order to sell a call at the same strike in the series that expires just after the announcement date (the series which will carry the highest IV and therefore the highest option prices). I set a limit price which is sufficiently greater than what I paid for the two-week-longer call to cover the commissions and leave a small profit as well.

This limit price should be met if either or both of the tendencies end up happening (the stock moves higher or IV increases). Most of the time, I have been able to complete the trade and end up with a calendar spread at a credit.

If I am successful in setting up a calendar spread at a credit, I am guaranteed to make a nice profit on the spread. I can’t lose because the call I own has two weeks more of life than the same-strike call I have sold to someone else, so it can be sold at a credit, no matter what the stock price does after the announcement. My greatest gain will come if the stock ends up very close to the strike price which I selected.

The Starbucks (SBUX) Play: SBUX announces on April 21. Two weeks ago, with SBUX trading about $58.60, I placed an order to buy SBUX May1-16 calls. I paid $1.12 ($112 per contract) plus $1.25 commission at the rate paid by Terry’s Tips subscribers at thinkorswim (if you are paying more than this as commission rate, you might consider opening an account at this brokerage – see the offer below).

I immediately placed an order to sell Apr4-16 60 calls at a limit price of $1.20. The Apr4-16 series expires on April 22, the day after the announcement on the 21st. This trade executed the very next day. After commissions, I had gained $5.50 for each spread, and was guaranteed to make an additional gain once the Apr4-16 calls expired. Since the May1-16 calls have two weeks more of remaining life than the Apr4-16 calls, the spread will always have at least some value. The closer the stock is to $60, the greater the value of the spread. If I am lucky enough to see it end up at $60 on April 22, I could expect to collect about $80 for each spread (on top of the $5.50 I already have collected).

The Facebook (FB) Play: One week ago today, knowing that FB would announce earnings on April 27, when the stock was trading at $112 (it had fallen $4 at the open from Friday’s close because an analyst forecast that their earnings would disappoint). I bought May2-16 114 calls for $4.40 ($440 plus $1.25 per contract, or $441.25). I then placed a good-til-cancelled order to sell Apr5-16 114 calls for $4.50. These calls would expire on April 29, two days after the announcement on the 27th.

Both the stock and IV of the Apr5-16 options rose on Tuesday, and my trade executed. IV for the Apr4-16 series was 40 when I reported this trade to you two weeks ago, and it is now 48. Now I am guaranteed a profit in FB as well, and I am rooting for the company to exceed expectations and a $114 price come along after the announcement. (As I write this, FB has fallen further, to about $110). There is something nice about holding an options investment that is guaranteed to make a gain no matter what the stock price does. Most of the time, I would be anguishing when my stock is dropping in price.

Closing Out the Trades: On the Friday when the short calls in these calendar spreads expire, you will have to make a decision. If the stock price is trading at a lower price than the strike price, you don’t really need to do anything as the short calls will expire worthless. However, you might want to buy them back at a nominal price (if that price is $.05 or lower, thinkorswim does not charge any commission, by the way). You would only buy them back if you also planned to make a sell trade as well. You could either sell the call you own which has two weeks of remaining life (essentially closing out the calendar spread), or you might sell the same-strike call which has one week of remaining life (this sale can almost always be made at more than 50% of what you could sell the two-week-out call).

A third alternative would be let the short call expire worthless and just hang on to your long calls (remember, they did not cost you anything at the beginning), and hope for a windfall gain if the stock manages to soar. Most of the time, I resist buying puts or calls outright, preferring instead to be a seller of short-term options. But every once in a while, it is fun to hang on to an option and see what might happen, especially when it didn’t cost me anything. It is sort of like getting a free lottery ticket (with better odds but a smaller pay-off than the lottery offers).

If the Sell Trade Doesn’t Execute: Some of the time, the stock will fall after you have made your call purchase and IV doesn’t rise enough to force an execution on your sell order. In those cases, I wait until the end of the day just before the announcement and sell the same call in my good-til-cancelled order at whatever price I can get. I have found that the stock often ticks up in the final hour of that day, and I can get a better price than earlier.

The calendar spread that you have created will not be made at a credit, but it still might be cheap compared to usual standards because of the elevated IV of the call you are selling.

Another alternative might be to sell your long call. It might be sold at a small profit, or more likely, a small loss. Even if the stock has fallen, IV might have moved high enough to make the option worth more than you paid for it.

This Week’s Trade, Abbvie (ABBV): ABBV is a drug company that pays a high dividend and doesn’t fluctuate very much. For these reasons, IV and option prices are quite low, but that doesn’t mean you can’t make gains with this same strategy. ABBV announces earnings before the market opens on April 28th.

With the stock trading about $58.50 this morning, I bought ABBV May2-16 58.5 calls for $1.87. This series closes two weeks later than the Apr5-16 series which expires on April 29, just after the April 28 announcement date. I have placed a good-til-cancelled order to sell Apr5-16 58.5 calls at a limit price of $1.95. IV for this series is currently 34 and can be expected to rise over the next week or two.

I selected the 58.5 strike instead of a higher strike because there is a $.57 dividend payable on April 13 (tomorrow) which may depress the stock by about that much. In fact, you might want to wait until tomorrow to buy the Apr5-16 call because it might be cheaper then.

I will report back to you on how these trades end up.

How to Play the Facebook (FB) Earnings Announcement

Monday, April 4th, 2016

Facebook (FB) will announce earnings on April 27, and this presents an opportunity to make an investment similar to the one I suggested last week regarding Starbucks (SBUX). One of the SBUX trades has already resulted in a small profit and has a guaranteed additional profit which could be significant in two weeks when the post-announcement options expire. I hope you enjoy reading about the trades I made in FB this morning (and my reasoning behind them).

Terry

How to Play the Facebook (FB) Earnings Announcement

First of all, a quick update on the suggestion I made one week ago concerning the upcoming SBUX announcement on April 21st. At that time, with SBUX trading about $58.60, I suggested 3 different ways to play this announcement, all of which were based on the stock moving a bit higher in anticipation of that big day (a good deal of the time, stocks do move higher in advance of the earnings announcement day). All three trades have increased in value since last week because SBUX has indeed moved higher, and now trades about $60.50.

One of the suggestions involved legging into a May1-16 – Apr4-16 60 call calendar spread. This involved buying May1-16 60 calls outright with a plan to sell Apr4-16 60 calls if the stock moved higher or implied volatility (IV) of the Apr4-16 options rose (two things that frequently happen as the announcement date approaches).

I bought SBUX May1-16 calls for $1.12 ($112 per contract) plus $1.25 commission at the rate paid by Terry’s Tips subscribers at thinkorswim (if you are paying more than this as commission rate, you might consider opening an account at this brokerage – see the offer below).

I didn’t have to wait very long for the stock to move enough higher so that I could sell the Apr4-16 60 calls for more than I had paid for the May1-16 calls. On Tuesday, I completed the calendar spread at the 60 strike by selling Apr4-16 60 calls for $1.20 ($120 per contract less $1.25 commission). After commissions, I had gained $5.50 for each spread, and was guaranteed to make an additional gain once the Apr4-16 calls expired and I would presumably sell the calendar spread. Since the May1-16 calls have two weeks more of remaining life than the Apr4-16 calls, the spread will always have at least some value. The closer the stock is to $60, the greater the value of the spread. If I am lucky enough to see it end up at $60 on April 22, I could expect to collect about $80 for each spread (on top of the $5.50 I already have collected).

While there is something nice about holding something that already has a small gain locked in, and there is still hope for a decent gain in two weeks, in retrospect, I wish I had completed the calendar on only half my positions. The stock rose to $61 and at the end of the week I could have sold the Apr4 calls for $.20 more than I did. I expected the stock to move higher in the week going into the announcement but it moved higher earlier than that. It probably still has room to climb over the next two weeks, but now I am locked in to a smaller gain than I could have made by waiting.

We are faced with a similar situation with Facebook which announces on the 27th. The May2-16 options series which expires two weeks after this date carries an IV of 37 which compares to 40 for the Apr4 series which expires just after the announcement (it is always nice to sell options with a higher IV than those that you buy). As the 27th approaches, IV for the Apr5-16, May1-16, and May2-16 series may move even higher (i.e., the option prices will increase even if the stock price remains flat).

I like to buy calendar spreads at a strike which is a couple of dollars higher than the current stock price in anticipation of the stock moving higher in the weeks or days leading up to the announcement. Today, FB fell about $4 because Deutsche Bank analyst Ross Sandler cautioned that its Q1 numbers may come in shy of high expectations, allowing investors to add to positions below current levels. There was also some disquieting news about the company’s Oculus Rift virtual reality headset. Initial product reviews were tepid and there will be some delivery problems at first (possibly due to too many sets being ordered?). In any event, the stock traded down to about $112.25 when I placed the following orders this morning.

First, I bought May2-16 114 calls for $4.40 ($440 plus $1.25 per contract, or $441.25). I then placed a good-til-cancelled order to sell Apr5-16 114 calls for $4.50. If this order is executed sometime in the next couple of weeks, I will have all my money back plus a little (including commissions) and will wait until April 29 to see how big my profit will be (the closer to $114 that FB is, the greater will be my gain). It could be as high as $200 per contract (the expected value of a FB at-the-money call with two weeks of remaining life (and an IV of 27).

In addition to buying May2-16 calls with the intention of legging into a calendar spread, I made the following two trades this morning:

Buy To Open 10 FB May2-16 114 calls (FB160513C114)
Sell To Open 10 FB Apr5-16 114 calls (FN160429C114) for a debit of $.60 (buying a calendar)

Buy To Open 10 FB May2-16 114 puts (FB160513P114)
Sell To Open 10 FB Apr5-16 114 puts (FN160429P114) for a debit of $.55 (buying a calendar)

You might notice that these are identical calendar spreads except that one is with calls and the others with puts. One thing we have learned is that the strike price is what is important with calendar spreads, not whether puts or calls are used. The risk profile is identical with either puts or calls (even though this does not make much intuitive sense).

These calendar spreads have sold the options which expire just after the announcement and these options carry the highest IV of any option series (i.e., they are the most expensive of all option series). I like these spreads because they are so cheap, and you can’t lose the entire investment no matter what. The value of your long options will always be higher than the value of the options you have sold because they have two weeks of additional remaining life.

Assuming IV of the May2-16 options will fall to about 27 (from the current 37), an at-the-money two-week option would carry a premium of at least $2.00 (the CBOE option calculator comes up with a $2.40 price). This would about triple your money if you sold the spread at this price. There is a good chance that IV might not fall that far. It is 31 for the Apr4-16 series that expires just before announcement week, for example. So it might be possible to sell the at-the-money spread for more than $2.00.

My best guess is that the call calendar spread could be sold at a profit on April 29th if FB is at any price within $4 of $114, and the put calendar spread could be sold at a profit if FB is at any price within $5 of $114.

If there is a big move in the price of FB in the next couple of weeks, I would probably buy more of these same calendar spreads at different strike prices. This would increase my chances of having at least some spreads at a strike which is close to the stock price and where the greatest profit potential lies. If FB moves up to $116, for example, I might buy some calendars at the 118 strike to expand the range of possible stock prices that would give me a net profit. I figure if I triple my money on one spread I could lose everything (an impossibility) on the other spread and still come out ahead.

I will report back to you on how these trades end up, or if I add any more spreads at different strike prices. Most companies report earnings each quarter, and there will be lots of opportunities to use these trading ideas on other companies you might like.

A $350 Investment on Apple Could Double in 2 Months

Thursday, December 3rd, 2015

On January 27, 2016, at 4:30 EST, Apple (AAPL) will announce earnings for 2015. This has always been an exciting time for investors, and this year should not be any different from years past.

Today, I made a $350 bet on AAPL’s earnings. I feel confident that I will double my money in 2 months on this wager, even if the stock does not do much between now and then. I would like to share my thinking with you, and maybe you will like to do something similar yourself.

Terry

A $350 Investment on Apple Could Double in 2 Months

AAPL is trading today about $116, only $5 higher than it was a year ago at this time.
Over that year, earnings have grown about 30% and sales have increased 20%, and the stock has gone up less than 5%. The world’s most valuable company sells at only 11 times earnings while it is growing nearly double that percentage, and even the 11 number should be adjusted to a lower figure because of the large stash of cash they are sitting on.

By any fundamental valuation standards, AAPL is a screaming bargain. Yet it has been in this same position for years, often held down because of tepid guidance it invariably puts out while announcing sales and earnings which are considerably above the guidance they gave last time around. The company seems to enjoy setting a low expectation bar and then crushing it with stellar earnings.

While Black Friday was a disappointment for most retailers, AAPL apparently had its best day ever. One analyst reported “the iPhone and Apple Watch were the most popular, with the Watch likely the number seller online. IPads are emerging as the first computing device for kids, with the iPad Air 2 the hottest gift item for kids eight and older, the Mini for those younger.” It sounds like it might be a good Christmas selling season for the company.

Two things almost always occur in the week or weeks leading up to AAPL’s January earnings announcement. First, the stock usually moves up $5 or so in anticipation of a positive announcement. Second, option prices skyrocket because there is often a big move in the stock after the announcement, either up or down.

With these thoughts in mind, I bought calendar spreads on AAPL today with the stock about $116. I chose the 120 strike price because I think at some point in the next few weeks, the stock will edge up to that price. I bought Feb-16 120 calls and sold Dec-16 120 calls as a calendar spread, paying $347 plus $2.50 commission per spread (the commission rate paid by Terry’s Tips subscribers at thinkorswim).
Just before the Dec-16 calls expire, I will buy them back and sell a further-out weekly option at a strike price which will hopefully net me at least $100. I expect to repeat this once or twice in the subsequent weeks, hopefully reducing my initial $350 cost to about $150 when I can sell the calls I am most looking forward to.

Those calls will be the Jan5-16 calls which will expire on January 29, just after the earnings announcement. They are not yet available for sale, but will be offered in a couple of weeks. These are the calls which will be juiced up by the uncertainty of the coming announcement. Looking back to January 2015 when there were two weeks to the post-announcement, these are thebif prices for those calls:

At-the-money – $4.00
$1 away-from-the-money – $3.50
$1 away-from-the-money – $3.05
$1 away-from-the-money – $2.66
$1 away-from-the-money – $2.28

If I am successful in getting my cost down to $150 by that time, I should be able to sell Jan5-16 calls for more than my net investment, therefore guaranteeing me a profit no matter what the stock price does after the announcement. Of course, the closer to $120 it is, the more profitable it will be for me when I close out the Feb-16 – Jan5-16 spread on Friday, January 29, 2016.

As with most option investments, this obviously will take a little work to carry out. But I sort of like that kind of work when it might result in my doubling my money in a two-month time period. It seems like a low-risk, high potential gain to me, and I look forward to having a little fun with it.

Of course, you should only make option investments with money you can truly afford to lose. Profits are not guaranteed, no matter how promising they might appear when you first set up your positions.

How to Set Up a Pre-Earnings Announcement Options Strategy

Monday, November 9th, 2015

One of the best times to set up an options strategy is just before a company announces earnings.  Today I would like to share our experience doing this last month with Facebook (FB) last month.  I hope you will read all the way through – there is some important information there.If you missed them, be sure to check out the short videos which explains why I like calendar spreads , and  How to Make Adjustments to Calendar and Diagonal Spreads.

Terry

How to Set Up a Pre-Earnings Announcement Options Strategy

When a company reports results each quarter, the stock price often fluctuates far more than usual, depending on how well the company performs compared both to past performance and to the market’s collective level of expectations.  Anticipating a big move one way or another, just prior to the announcement, option prices skyrocket, both puts and calls.

At Terry’s Tips, our basic strategy involves selling short-term options to others (using longer-term options as collateral for making those sales).  One of the absolute best times for us is the period just before an upcoming earnings announcement. That is when we can collect the most premium.

An at-the-money call (stock price and strike price are the same) for a call with a month of remaining life onFacebook (FB) trades for about $3 ($300 per call).  If that call expires shortly after an earnings announcement, it will trade for about $4.80.  That is a significant difference. In options parlance, option prices are “high” or “low” depending on their implied volatility (IV).  IV is much higher for all options series in the weeks before the announcement.  IV is at its absolute highest in the series that expires just after the announcement.  Usually that is a weekly option series.

Here are IV numbers for FB at-the-money calls before and after the November 4th earnings announcement:

One week option life before, IV = 57  One week option life after, IV = 25
Two week option life before, IV = 47  Two week option life after, IV = 26
One month option life before, IV =38  One month option life after, IV = 26
Four month option life before, IV = 35  Four month option life after, IV = 31

These numbers clearly show that when you are buying a 4-month-out call (March, IV=35) and selling a one-week out call (IV=57), before an announcement, you are buying less expensive options (lower IV) than those which you are selling. After the announcement, this gets reversed.  The short-term options you are selling are relatively less expensive than the ones you are buying.  Bottom line, before the announcement, you are buying low and selling high, and after the announcement, you are buying high and selling low.

You can make a lot of money buying a series of longer-term call options and selling short-term calls at several strike prices in the series that expires shortly after the announcement.  If the long and short sides of your spread are at the same strike price, you call it a calendar spread, and if the strikes are at different prices, it is called a diagonal spread.

Calendar and diagonal spreads essentially work the same, with the important point being the strike price of the short option that you have sold.  The maximum gain for your spread will come if the stock price ends up exactly at that strike price when the option expires.  If you can correctly guess the price of the stock after the announcement, you can make a ton of money.

But as we all know, guessing the short-term price of a stock is a really tough thing to do, especially when you are trying to guess where it might end up shortly after the announcement.  You never know how well the company has done, or more importantly, how the market will react to how the company has performed.  For that reason, we recommend selecting selling short-term options at several different strike prices.  This increases your chances of having one short strike which gains you the maximum amount possible.

Here are the positions held in our actual FB portfolio at Terry’s Tips on Friday, October 30th, one week before the Nov-1 15 calls would expire just after FB announced earnings on November 4th:

Foxy Face Book Positions Nov 2015

Foxy Face Book Positions Nov 2015

We owned calls which expired in March 2016 at 3 different strikes (97.5, 100, and 105) and we were short calls with one week of remaining life at 4 different strikes (103, 105, 106, and 107). There was one calendar spread at the 105 strike and all the others were diagonal spreads.  We owned 2 more calls than we were short.  This is often part of our strategy just before announcement day.  A fairly large percent of the time, the stock moves higher in the day or two before the announcement as anticipation of a positive report kicks in.  We planned to sell another call before the announcement, hopefully getting a higher price than we would have received earlier.  (We sold a Nov1-15 204 call for $2.42 on Monday).  We were feeling pretty positive about the stock, and maintained a more bullish (higher net delta position) than we normally do.

Here is the risk profile graph for the above positions.  It shows our expected gain or loss one week later (after the announcement) when the Nov1-15 calls expired:

Foxy Face Book Rick Profile Graph Nov 2015

Foxy Face Book Rick Profile Graph Nov 2015

When we produced this graph, we instructed the software to assume that IV for the Mar-16 calls would fall from 35 to 30 after the announcement.  If we hadn’t done that, the graph would have displayed unrealistically high possible returns.  You can see with this assumption, a flat stock price should result in a $300 gain, and if the stock rose $2 or higher, the gain would be in the $1000 range (maybe a bit higher if the stock was up just moderately because of the additional $242 we collected from selling another call).

So what happened?  FB announced earnings that the market liked.  The stock soared from about $102 to about $109 after the announcement (but then fell back a bit on Friday, closing at $107.10).  We bought back the expiring Nov1-15 calls (all of which were in the money on Thursday or Friday) and sold further-out calls at several strike prices to get set up for the next week.   The portfolio gained $1301 in value, rising from $7046 to $8347, up 18.5% for the week.  This is just a little better than our graph predicted.  The reason for the small difference is that IV for the March calls fell only to 31, and we had estimated that it would fall to 30.

You can see why we like earnings announcement time, especially when we are right about the direction the stock moves.  In this case, we would have made a good gain no matter how high the stock might go (because we had one uncovered long call).  Most of the time, we select short strikes which yield a risk profile graph with more downside protection and limited upside potential (a huge price rise would yield a lower gain, and possibly a loss).

One week earlier, in our Starbucks (SBUX) portfolio, we had another earnings week.  SBUX had a positive earnings report, but the market was apparently disappointed with guidance and the level of sales in China, and the stock was pushed down a little after the announcement.  Our portfolio managed to gain 18% for the week.

Many people would be happy with 18% a year on their invested capital, and we have done it in a single week in which an earnings announcement took place.  We look forward to having three more such weeks when reporting season comes around once again over the course of a year, both for these two underlyings and the 4 others we also trade (COST, NKE, JNJ, and SPY).
“I have confidence in your system…I have seen it work very well…currently I have had a first 100% gain, and am now working to diversify into more portfolios.  Goldman/Sachs is also doing well – up about 40%…

Stock Option Strategy for an Earnings Announcement

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

One of the best times to use an options strategy is just before a company makes its quarterly earnings announcement.  That is the time when puts and calls get very expensive.  When the earnings come out, investors are usually disappointed or elated, and the stock price often makes a big move.  That is why those puts and calls are so expensive just prior to the announcement.

Since our favorite stock options strategy is to sell options just before expiration, the pre-announcement time is often the perfect time to take action.  Today I would like to share a recommendation I made to paying subscribers over the past weekend.

Terry

Stock Option Strategy for an Earnings Announcement

Keurig Green Mountain (GMCR) has had quite a year, more than doubling in value.  Coke came along at the beginning of 2014 and bought a billion dollars’ worth of GMCR stock (and so far, they have picked up a billion dollar profit – not bad).

On Wednesday, November 19, GMCR announces earnings, two days before the November expiration for stock options.  Option prices are sky high – implied volatility (IV) for the November series is 67 compared to 44 for the January series.  While all the option prices will fall after the announcement, the risk profile graph shows unusually high possible gains at almost any higher price with the spread suggested below, and the stock can also fall by a large margin and gains should result as well.

An interesting way to play this earnings announcement would be to buy a December 140 put and sell a November 150 put.  You could do it at credit of about $1.80 (and with a $1000 maintenance requirement, your net investment (and maximum theoretical loss) would be $820 per spread).  Check out the risk profile graph assuming that IV for the December put would fall by 10 after the announcement (it probably won’t fall that far).

GMCR Risk Profile Graph November 2014

GMCR Risk Profile Graph November 2014

No matter how high the stock goes, there will be a gain because the 150 put would expire worthless, and the stock could fall $12 before a loss would result on the downside.  I like those odds.

Maybe you are a little more bearish on the stock (the whisper numbers for earnings are about 10% higher than analysts’ projections which means that expectations may be too high, and a lower stock price may come about because of those expectations).  In that case, you might consider buying a December 135 put and selling a November 145 put.  You could collect about $1.10 for the spread and risk $890, and the risk profile graph would look like this (again assuming IV for the December put will fall by 10):

GMCR Risk Profile Graph 2 November 2014

GMCR Risk Profile Graph 2 November 2014

The downside break-even point is about $140, or almost $13 lower than the current price, and a gain of some sort will accrue at any price above $145 because of the intitial credit and the fact that the put will expire worthless (and there will be some residual value with the December 135 put).  This looks like a pretty secure way to make 10% (or maybe a whole lot more) in the next two weeks. A profit should result if the stock does anything other than fall by more than 8% after the announcement.  The maximum gain would be about 30%, and would come if the stock fell by about $8 after the announcement (and some sort of gain would come no matter how high the stock might go).

Note: GMCR has gone up about $2 in early trading today, and the above spreads we discussed in our Saturday Report would net slightly less if you placed them today today (i.e., your investment would be slightly higher than the above numbers).

Update on the ongoing SVXY put demonstration portfolio.  This sample demonstration portfolio holds a SVXY Mar-15 70, and each week, (almost always on Friday), we buy back an expiring weekly put and sell a one-week put in its place, trying to sell at a strike which is $1 – $2 in the money (i.e., at a strike which is $1 or $2 above the stock price)  Our goal in this portfolio is to make 3% a week.

Last week, SVXY rose about $3, and we bought back the expiring Nov1-14 70 put (then out of the money) and sold a Nov2-14 73 put, collecting a credit of $2.53 ($250.50 after commissions).  That made our long Mar-15 70 put $3 below the strike of the put we had sold, and the broker would assess a $300 maintenance call.  We could have handled that because we had over $600 in cash in the account, but we decided to roll the Mar-15 70 put up to the 75 strike, (buying a vertical spread).  We paid $2.55 ($252.50 after commissions).  We can now sell weekly puts at strikes as high as 75 without incurring a maintenance requirement.

The account value is now $1445, up $211 from the starting value of $1234 on October 17th ,3 weeks ago.  This works out to $70 a week, nearly double the $37 weekly gain we need to achieve our 3% weekly goal.

I will continue trading this account and let you know from time to time how close I am achieving my goal of 3% a week, although I will not report every trade immediately as I make it.  I will follow the guidelines for rolling over as outlined above and earlier, so you should be able to do it on your own if you wish.

Legging Into a Short Iron Condor Spread

Monday, March 3rd, 2014

Today I would like share with you the results of an actual trade recommendations I made for my paying subscribers on January 4th of this year and how subsequent price changes have opened up option possibilities that can further improve possibilities for a first investment.

Please don’t get turned off by what this new spread is called.

Terry

Legging Into a Short Iron Condor Spread

In my weekly Saturday Report that I send to paying subscribers, on January 4, 2014 I set up an actual demonstration portfolio in a separate trading account at thinkorswim in which I made long-term bets that three underlying stocks (GOOG, SPY, and GMCR) would be higher than they currently were at some distant point in the future.  The entire portfolio would make exactly 93% with the three spreads I chose if I were right about the stock prices.

Almost two months later, things are looking pretty good for all three spreads, but that is not as important as what we can learn about option possibilities.

If you recall, early this year I was quite bullish on Green Mountain Coffee Roasters (GMCR) which has recently changed their name to Keurig Green Mountain.  The major reason was that three insiders who had never bought shares before had recently made huge purchases (two of a million dollars each).  I Googled these men and learned that they were mid-level executives who were clearly not high rollers.  I figured that if they were committing this kind of money, they must have had some very good reason(s),  Also, for four solid months, not a single director had sold a single share, something that was an unusual pattern for the company.

My feelings about the company were also boosted when a company writing for Seeking Alpha published an article in which they had selected GMCR as the absolute best company from a fundamental standpoint in a database of some 6000 companies.

This is what I wrote in that Saturday Report – “The third spread, on Green Mountain Coffee Roasters (GMCR), is a stronger bullish bet than either of the first two, for two reasons.  The stock is trading about in the middle of the long and short put prices (70 and 80), and the time period is only six months (expiring in June 2014) rather than 11 or 12 months.  I paid $540 for the Jun-14 80 – Jun-14 70 vertical put credit spread.  My maximum loss is $460 per spread if the stock closes below $70, and I will make 115% after commissions in six months if it closes above $80.”

This vertical put credit spread involved selling the Jun-14 80 puts for $13.06 and buying the Jun-70 puts for $7.66, collecting $540 for each spread.  I sold 5 of these spreads, collecting a total of $2700.  There would be a maintenance requirement of $5000 for the spreads (not a margin loan which would have interest charged on it, but an amount that I couldn’t use to buy other stocks or options).  Subtracting what I received in cash from the maintenance requirement, my real cost (and maximum loss) would be $2300.  If GMCR closed at any price above $80 on June 21, 2014, both puts would expire worthless and I could keep my $2700 and make 115% after commissions (there would be no commissions to pay if both puts expired worthless).

An interesting side note to the $2700 cash I received in this transaction.  In the same account, I also owned shares of my favorite underlying stock.  I am so bullish on this other company (which is really not a company at all, but an Exchange Traded Product (ETP)) that I owned some on margin, paying 9% on a margin loan.  The cash I received from the credit spread was applied to my margin loan and reduced the total on which I was paying interest.  In other words, I was enjoying a 9% gain on the spread proceeds while I waited out the six months for the options to expire.

In case you hadn’t heard, GMCR announced on February 5th that they had executed a 10-year contract with Coke to sell individual cups on an exclusive basis.  The stock soared some 50%, from $80 to over $120.  In addition, Coke bought 10% of GMCR for $1.25 billion, and gained over $600 million on their purchase in a single day.  Obviously, those insiders knew what they were doing when they made their big investments last November.

Now I am in an interesting position with this spread.  It looks quite certain that I will make the 115% if I just sit and wait another 4 months.  The stock is highly unlikely to fall back below $80 at this point.  I could but back the spread today for $.64, ($320 for the 5 spreads) and be content with a $2380 gain now rather than $2700 in June.

But instead, I decided to wait it out, and add a twist to my investment.  Since the deal with Coke will not reach the market until at least 2015, it seems to me that we are in for a period of waiting until the chances of success for single servings of Coke are better known.  The stock is probably not going to move by a large amount in either direction between now and June.

With that in mind, I sold another vertical credit spread with June options, this time using calls.  I bought Jun-14 160 calls and sold Jun-14 150 calls and collected $1.45 ($725 less $12.50 commissions).  These options will expire worthless if GMCR is at any price below $150 on June 21, 2014, something that I believe is highly likely.  I think it has already taken the big upward move that it will take this year.

If the stock ends up at any price between $80 and $150, I will make money on both spreads that I sold.  Now the total I can gain is $3400 (after commissions) and my net investment has now been reduced to $1600 and my maximum gain is 212% on my money at risk.

This new spread will not have any maintenance requirement because the broker understands that I can’t lose money on both vertical spreads I have sold.  He will look at the two spreads and notice that the difference between the long and short strike prices is 10 for both spreads.  As long as he is setting aside $5000 in a maintenance requirement on the account, he knows that I can lose that maximum amount on only one of the two spreads.

What I have done is to leg into what is called a short iron condor spread (legging in means you buy one side of a spread to start, and then add the other side at a later time – the normal way to execute a spread is to execute both sides at the same time).  You don’t have to know any more about it than know its name at this time, but I invite you to become a Terry’s Tips Insider and learn all about short iron condors as well as many other interesting options strategies.

Follow-Up on Green Mountain Coffee Roasters

Monday, February 10th, 2014

Twice in the past three weeks I told everyone why I was bullish on Green Mountain Coffee Roasters (GMCR) and how I was playing the options prior to their earnings announcement last week.

If anyone noticed, the stock is trading about 40% higher now after the company announced a 10-year deal with Coke for selling single portions of Coke.

This was one of those sad times where I was right but didn’t make very much money from the great news, however.  Such is sometimes the plight of owning options.  Almost anything can happen, depending on what kind of a spread you put on.

Enjoy the discussion of three kinds of option spreads.

Terry

Follow-Up on Green Mountain Coffee Roasters

This is what I wrote two weeks ago – “I bought a diagonal call spread, buying GMCR Jun-14 70 calls and selling Feb1-14 80 calls.  The spread cost me $9.80 at a time when the stock was trading at just below $80.  If the stock moves higher, no matter how high it goes, this spread will be worth at least $10 plus the value of the time premium for the 70 call with about 5 months of remaining value, no matter how much IV might fall for the June options. The higher the stock might soar, the less I would make, but I expect I should make at least 20% on my money (if the stock moves higher) in 17 days.”

While the spread could not lose money no matter how high the stock might go, this was not a great investment to make if you were as bullish on the company as I was.  The more it rose above $80, the less it would make.  A 40% move on an earnings announcement is highly unusual, but that is what happened.

When the stock traded down a bit last Friday, I sold that spread for $11.00, making $1.20 less commissions of $.05, or $1.15 ($115 per spread).  That worked out to about 12%.  I will never complain about making a gain, but this was a major disappointment when I was so right about how the stock would move after the announcement.  It just moved a whole lot more than I expected.

Last week I told you about another spread I placed on GMCR before earnings.  This was a calendar spread (same strike, buy one further-out month and sell a shorter-term option).  The trick was to pick the strike price you believed the stock would end up after the announcement.  With the stock trading at $80 before the announcement, I suggested to pick the 85 strike (buying April calls and selling March calls for about $.80 per contract).

The further away from $85 the stock traded after the announcement, the less well the calendar spread would do.  On the other hand, if you correctly picked the price, you could make 200% or more on your money.  When the stock soared $30 and was trading around $110, this spread lost about half its value (I actually bought 100 of these spreads at the 90 strike instead of the 85 strike, but this spread did not do much better – I am hanging on to most of the contracts just in case it reverses direction over the next 6 weeks).

Another spread which I did not report to everyone (except my paying subscribers) was a vertical put credit spread, selling 85 puts and buying 75 puts in the same month.  I placed these trades for June, collecting a credit of $5.20, making my investment $480 per spread (this is the amount that would be my maximum loss if GMCR closes below $75 in June).  If the stock closes above $85 (which it looks highly likely to do), I will make 108% on my investment.  (I also sold similar vertical put credit spreads for both March and June at others strikes, and every spread appears that it will make 70% or better at expiration).

This time around, the calendar spreads didn’t fare well because the stock skyrocketed so high.  It is really necessary to guess where the stock will end up with that kind of spread.  I was too conservative in my bullishness. Who would have ever guessed that the stock would soar by 40%?  Certainly not me.  But I was happy that I also bought some other directional spreads that profited from the upward move (these spreads would have done just as well, or better, if the upward stock price move had been smaller).

An Interesting Calendar Spread Play

Wednesday, February 5th, 2014

Today after the close, one of my favorite stocks, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters (GMRC) , announces earnings.  I am taking quite a chance telling you about another option spread investment that I made this week because if the stock tanks after today’s announcement, I won’t be looking so good.The idea I am suggesting can be used for any stock you might have an opinion about, and it could easily double your money in about six weeks if you are approximately right about where the stock might be at that time.

Terry

An Interesting Calendar Spread Play

As you probably know, I love calendar spreads.  These spreads involve buying a longer-out option and selling a shorter-length option at the same strike price.  You only have to come up with the difference between the two option prices when you place the order.

When the short options expire, if the stock is very close to the strike price of your spread, you can expect to sell the spread for a great deal more than you paid for it.The further away from the strike price the stock is when the short options expire, the less valuable the original spread will be.

The trick is guessing where the stock might end up when the short options expire. This takes a little luck since no one really knows what any stock is likely to do in the short run.  But if it’s a stock you have followed closely, you might have an idea of where it is headed.

I happen to like GMCR.  I like knowing that insiders have bought millions of dollars worth of stock in the past few months and 30% of the stock has been sold short (a short squeeze could push the stock way up).  So I am guessing that the stock will be closer to $85 in six weeks compared to $80 where it closed yesterday (as I write this Wednesday morning it has moved up to about $81.50).

I bought a calendar spread on GMCR at the 85 strike, buying Apr-14 calls and selling Mar-14 calls.  I paid $.85 ($85) per spread for 10 spreads, shelling out $850 plus $25 in commissions.  Here is the risk profile graph for March 22 when the short options expire:

GMCR calendar risk profile graph feb 2014

GMCR calendar risk profile graph feb 2014

The graph shows that the stock can fall by as much as $5 and I will make a gain, or it can go up by more than $10 and I should expect a gain.  This seems to be a pretty large break-even range to me.  If I am lucky enough to see the stock end up near my $85 target, it is possible to triple my money in six weeks.

One nice thing about calendar spreads is that you can’t lose all of your investment.   No matter where the stock goes, the value of the April options will always be greater than the price of the March options at the same strike price.  When you are only risking $85 per spread, you can be quite wrong about where the stock ends up and still expect to make a gain.

 

A Post-Earnings Play on Starbucks

Monday, January 27th, 2014

I am a coffee lover, and not only am I adding to my Green Mountain Coffee Roasters (GMRC) spreads discussed last week, I am adding two new spreads this week in Starbucks (SBUX).  By betting on both these coffee companies, I end up not caring whether everyone is drinking coffee at home or at their favorite Starbucks café, just as long as they continue to enjoy the java.And as I sip away at my 4+ cup daily coffee allotment, I can feel I am helping my investments just a tiny little bit.  I will feel so righteous.  The coffee can only taste better.

Terry

A Post-Earnings Play on Starbucks

SBUX announced earnings last week, and they were pretty much in line with expectations.  The stock moved a little higher and then fell back a bit along with everything else on Friday.

The company is doing quite well.  Total sales rose almost 12%, same-store sales rose 5%, earnings were up 25%, and they were opening new stores at the rate of nearly 5 per day (417 for the quarter).

While all those numbers are impressive, the market seems a little concerned over the valuation.  It is selling at 28 times earnings (23 times forward earnings).  The stock has fallen nearly 10% from its high reached just after the last earnings announcement.

The stock has displayed a pattern of being fairly flat between announcement dates.  With that in mind, it might be a good idea to buy some calendar spreads, some at a strike price just above its current stock price ($74.39) and some at a lower strike.

I will be buying SBUX 10 Apr-14 – Mar-14 75 call calendar spreads (natural price $.60, or $625 including commissions) and 5 Apr-14 – Mar-14 72.5 put calendar spreads (natural price $.53, or $278 including commissions) for a total investment of $903.

Here is what the risk profile graph looks like for when the March options expire on the 21st:

SBUX risk profile graph

SBUX risk profile graph

If the stock stays flat, these spreads could just about double the investment in the 52 days I will have to wait.  My break-even range extends about $3 in either direction.  Any change less than $3 in either direction should result in a profit.

Since the stock has fallen so far from its high even though it seems to be doing very well, I don’t expect that any further weakness will be substantial.  On the other hand, the valuation continues to be relatively high so I don’t see it moving dramatically higher either.  It looks to me like a quiet period is the most likely scenario, and that is the ideal thing for a strategy of calendar spreads.

I will report back on the success of these spreads after the March expiration.  I like my chances here.

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I have been trading the equity markets with many different strategies for over 40 years. Terry Allen's strategies have been the most consistent money makers for me. I used them during the 2008 melt-down, to earn over 50% annualized return, while all my neighbors were crying about their losses.

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